Master's Message September 2017

Greetings​ ​Brethren,

Allow​ ​me​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​this​ ​message​ ​by​ ​extending​ ​my​ ​gratitude​ ​to​ ​all​ ​of​ ​you​ ​my​ ​Brothers;​ ​whose Masonic​ ​work​ ​continues​ ​outside​ ​the​ ​walls​ ​of​ ​our​ ​Masonic​ ​Temple,​ ​even​ ​in​ ​the​ ​months​ ​when​ ​we go​ ​dark,​ ​especially​ ​in​ ​times​ ​of​ ​crisis.​ ​​The​ ​tenets​ ​of​ ​Freemasonry​ ​are​ ​ethical​ ​principles​ ​that​ ​are acceptable​ ​to​ ​all​ ​good​ ​men.​ ​It​ ​teaches​ ​tolerance​ ​toward​ ​all​ ​mankind,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​consists​ ​of​ ​men bound​ ​together​ ​by​ ​​bonds​​ ​of​ ​Brotherly​ ​Love​ ​and​ ​Affection.​​ ​These​ ​are​ ​simply​ ​signposts​ ​that​ ​keep reminding​ ​us​ ​our​ ​duties​ ​when​ ​life​ ​present​ ​us​ ​with​ ​challenges,​ ​adversities,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​is​ ​in​ ​those​ ​times when​ ​you​ ​should​ ​always​ ​go​ ​back​ ​to​ ​our​ ​basic​ ​teachings,​ ​Brotherly​ ​Love,​ ​Relief,​ ​and​ ​Truth.

Speaking​ ​about​ ​Brother​ly ​Love,​ ​what​ ​an​ ​amazing​ ​time​ ​we​ ​had​ ​at​ ​our​ ​picnic​ ​back​ ​in​ ​July;​ ​thank you​ ​all​ ​again​ ​for​ ​participating,​ ​for​ ​collaborating,​ ​and​ ​for​ ​just​ ​enjoy​ ​the​ ​wonderful​ ​time​ ​together​ ​as a​ ​big​ ​Masonic​ ​Family.

It’s​ ​unbelievable​ ​how​ ​time​ ​flies,​ ​Summer​ ​is​ ​almost​ ​over,​ ​and​ ​it’s​ ​time​ ​to​ ​resume​ ​our​ ​Masonic Labor.​ ​Using​ ​the​ ​words​ ​of​ ​Nathaniel​ ​Hawthorne​ ​“Time​ ​flies​ ​over​ ​us,​ ​but​ ​leaves​ ​its​ ​shadow behind”.​ ​Nothing​ ​stays​ ​undone.​ ​As​ ​we​ ​continue​ ​our​ ​Masonic​ ​Journey​ ​throughout​ ​life,​ ​let​ ​me remind​ ​you​ ​that​ ​we,​ ​as​ ​Freemasons,​ ​are​ ​taught​ ​to​ ​always​ ​strive​ ​to​ ​square​ ​and​ ​polish​ ​our​ ​rough ashlar,​ ​our​ ​own​ ​lives​ ​are​ ​like​ ​raw​ ​stones​ ​waiting​ ​to​ ​be​ ​worked​ ​on,​ ​and​ ​it’s​ ​imperative​ ​to​ ​make our​ ​best​ ​efforts​ ​to​ ​continue​ ​our​ ​personal​ ​growth,​ ​always​ ​aiming​ ​to​ ​become​ ​a​ ​better​ ​man,​ ​a better​ ​husband,​ ​a​ ​better​ ​father,​ ​a​ ​better​ ​human​ ​being.

I’ll​ ​share​ ​something​ ​interesting​ ​I​ ​came​ ​across​ ​this​ ​Summer;​ ​Suzuki​ ​Roshi,​ ​a​ ​Zen​ ​Master​ ​in​ ​the Japanese​ ​tradition​ ​wrote​ ​what​ ​it​ ​seems​ ​to​ ​be​ ​his​ ​only​ ​English​ ​Calligraphy​ ​work:​ ​“Do​ ​not​ ​say​ ​too late.“​ ​It’s​ ​a​ ​remarkably​ ​simple​ ​phrase.​ ​But,​ ​it’s​ ​a​ ​phrase​ ​pregnant​ ​with​ ​hope,​ ​encouragement, and​ ​even​ ​comfort.​ ​We​ ​all​ ​know​ ​there​ ​is​ ​a​ ​clock​ ​ticking​ ​in​ ​our​ ​lives,​ ​it’s​ ​just​ ​that​ ​the​ ​older​ ​one gets,​ ​the​ ​more​ ​one​ ​becomes​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​its​ ​sound.

But,​ ​Suzuki’s​ ​admonition,​ ​spoken​ ​gently​ ​but​ ​firmly,​ ​it​ ​reminds​ ​me​ ​that​ ​whatever​ ​time​ ​we​ ​have left​ ​on​ ​this​ ​earth,​ ​it​ ​isn’t​ ​too​ ​late​ ​for​ ​us​ ​to​ ​learn​ ​new​ ​things,​ ​become​ ​more​ ​compassionate, reconcile​ ​with​ ​someone​ ​we​ ​have​ ​wounded​ ​or​ ​who​ ​might​ ​have​ ​wounded​ ​us.​ ​It​ ​isn’t​ ​too​ ​late​ ​for​ ​us to​ ​explore​ ​new​ ​places—both​ ​within​ ​us​ ​and​ ​without.​ ​It​ ​isn’t​ ​too​ ​late​ ​for​ ​us​ ​to​ ​write​ ​something meaningful—even​ ​if​ ​it’s​ ​just​ ​meaningful​ ​to​ ​a​ ​few​ ​people.​ ​It​ ​isn’t​ ​too​ ​late​ ​to​ ​pay​ ​a​ ​visit​ ​to​ ​an​ ​old Brother,​ ​or​ ​visit​ ​a​ ​sick​ ​Brother​ ​at​ ​the​ ​hospital.​ ​Let​ ​us​ ​not​ ​cling​ ​to​ ​time,​ ​nor​ ​to​ ​“being​ ​too​ ​busy”​ ​to extend​ ​our​ ​help​ ​to​ ​those​ ​who​ ​need​ ​it.​ ​At​ ​the​ ​end,​ ​if​ ​you​ ​meditate​ ​upon​ ​it,​ ​our​ ​job​ ​as​ ​humans​ ​is​ ​to help​ ​each​ ​other.

As​ ​we​ ​begin​ ​our​ ​Masonic​ ​Labor​ ​this​ ​September,​ ​I​ ​have​ ​the​ ​pleasure​ ​to​ ​invite​ ​you​ ​all​ ​to​ ​our regular​ ​communication​ ​meeting,​ ​where​ ​we​ ​have​ ​prepared​ ​a​ ​special​ ​program​ ​by​ ​Karin​ ​Sprague, a​ ​Stone​ ​Carver​ ​and​ ​owner​ ​of​ ​Karin​ ​Sprague​ ​Stone​ ​Carvers​ ​located​ ​in​ ​Scituate,​ ​RI.​ ​She’ll​ ​be giving​ ​a​ ​talk​ ​about​ ​what​ ​she​ ​calls​ ​“The​ ​Art​ ​of​ ​Remembering”,​ ​teaching​ ​us​ ​about​ ​the​ ​process​ ​of modern​ ​Stone​ ​Carving.

Brethren,​ ​our​ ​regular​ ​meetings​ ​should​ ​leave​ ​some​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​teaching​ ​behind,​ ​whether​ ​is​ ​in​ ​the form​ ​of​ ​words,​ ​or​ ​a​ ​kind​ ​gesture​ ​toward​ ​another​ ​Brother.​ ​I​ ​encourage​ ​you​ ​also​ ​to​ ​bring​ ​your questions​ ​and​ ​concerns​ ​to​ ​our​ ​Lodge,​ ​only​ ​by​ ​deeply​ ​listening​ ​can​ ​we​ ​find​ ​solutions,​ ​if​ ​you formulate​ ​the​ ​right​ ​questions,​ ​we’ll​ ​find​ ​the​ ​right​ ​answers.

Please​ ​send​ ​your​ ​R.S.V.P.​ ​for​ ​dinner​ ​since​ ​we’ll​ ​be​ ​having​ ​home​ ​made​ ​Lasagna​ ​(meat​ ​and Vegetarian),​ ​salad​ ​and​ ​fresh​ ​bread.

Invite​ ​other​ ​Brothers​ ​if​ ​you​ ​can,​ ​let’s​ ​bring​ ​those​ ​Brothers​ ​who​ ​have​ ​been​ ​absent​ ​for​ ​a​ ​while back​ ​into​ ​our​ ​Lodge,​ ​let’s​ ​work​ ​together,​ ​after​ ​all,​ ​this​ ​is​ ​our​ ​Craft.

Fraternally yours,

Javier R. Alfonzo
Worshipful Master